How to write a creative brief (identifying your target audience) part 2 of 5

by Duncan Millar on November 11, 2011

A creative brief is written to give your designer as much information as possible about your organisation to help them create your intranet design.

In the last article we covered the importance of writing a company profile to give them an understanding of your organisation’s business and operational structure.

Once this has been completed, you will need to provide details to your designer of who your intranet’s target audience is going to be.

Any type of demographic information that you may have will be useful.

This may include:

  • Age
  • Sex
  • Income
  • Occupation
  • Location

This information will enable your intranet to be designed to appeal to your target audience.

If your intranet is aimed at a predominantly male audience under the age of 25, you will want to use colours and a design that will appeal to this demographic. If you were designing for a female audience the presentation may be completely different.

Provide design examples

Include examples of designs you like and don’t like. If you’re not sure where to start, have a look at sales literature, brand guidelines, product brochures and marketing material. These are used to get design cues and don’t necessarily have to be from your own company.

You can then explain what you like/dislike about the:-

  • Colour
  • Imagery
  • Quantity of text
  • The atmosphere the design creates

Understanding your tastes will help your designer create a design that is appropriate for your organisation.

Research other intranets

You may want to have a look at other intranets to see what imagery has been used by other organisations. Your intranet provider should be able to provide you with examples of sites they have implemented, why certain styles work and how they have aided usability. Alternatively, you may wish to attend intranet showcases or seminars to get some inspiration. Looking at other sites will give you an idea of the type of visuals that you like or dislike and these can then be discussed with your designer.

Once you have given your designer an understanding of your target audience, you can decide how you wish to speak to your chosen audience. We will discuss this further in the next article.

Topics: 4. Form